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The Herding Group

The Herding Group was born when man came down from the mountains and began to settle in the fertile lowlands and valleys. He no longer needed the large and often cumbersome dogs to guard them, such as the Great Pyrenean dog. The requirement now was for smaller, faster and more mobile dogs that could keep large flocks together. For more information please visit our website at www.animalshelter

The Non-Sporting Group

The utility, or Non-sporting group includes dogs of many different sizes and shapes which perform a variety of tasks. The group ranges from the large breeds such as the Dalmation and Standard Poodle, to the much smaller breeds like the Boston Terrier. For more information please visit our website at www.animalshelter.org

The Terrier Group

The word “terrier” comes from the Latin word for “terra” which means earth and aptly describes the part of the landscape in which these were originally employed- Having been bred to drive badgers, foxes, rabbits, and other quarry from their underground retreats. On occasions, when the terriers could not reach into the borrow or the earth, it would still indicate the presence of the quarry to the hunter, who would then unearth it by other means. For more information please visit our website at www.animalshelter.org

The Sporting Group

Dogs in the Sporting group were all bred to assist in the hunting and retrieving of game. As early as the 6th century B.C. there were records of certain types of dogs which instead of pursuing game, sniffed the scent with a raised head and then stood completely still. Although originally considered a rather unsatisfactory characteristic in a hunting dog, it was later realized that the behavior could, in fact, be very useful in the right circumstances. This was particularly the case when hunters wanted to net partridge or quail, for example. The dogs were trained to crouch sit or lie down when they had spotted game so the hunters could draw a net over the birds before they were able to fly away. For more information please visit our website at www.animalshelter.org


Animal Shelter Frequently Asked Questions
1. How can I volunteer?
2. How old do I need to be to volunteer?
3. Can I volunteer to work with a shelter in order to fullfill my community service hours?
4. I have a dog/cat that I can no longer care for, can you take him/her in?
5. I lost my dog/cat can you help me find it?
6. I found a dog/cat what can I do?

1. How can I volunteer?

If you would like to volunteer, the best thing to do is to use our shelter search feature, after entering your zip code and searching for local shelters, pick up the phone and give them a call. Most shelters rely on and are happy to have any help you can provide them.

2. How old do I need to be to volunteer?

The age varies from shelter to shelter, although the general answer is 15 without an adult, and 12 with an adult we recommend calling the shelter ahead of time to find out if they have any special age requirements. You can go here and use our shelter search feature.

3. Can I volunteer to work with a shelter in order to fullfill my community service hours?

This would depend on the status of the shelter. Most shelters can help you fullfill your community service hours, however we recommend calling ahead to verify that the shelter in question will meet your requirements.

4. I have a dog/cat that I can no longer care for, can you take him/her in?

We do not take in animals, we are an online resource who provide the shelters, rescues and community with a way to work together to find more animals a loving home. If you would like to sign up for a free account to post your pet on our site please click here You do not need to be a shelter to add your pet to our database.

5. I lost my dog/cat can you help me find it?

If you have lost your pet, we suggest you do a couple of things. First please create a free account here and add your pet with a status of lost. If someone does find your pet they will be able to search for any lost pet in our database. If your lost pet is listed the chances of your pet being returned are significantly higher. We also suggest that you read our lost and found FAQ.

6. I found a dog/cat what can I do?

If you have found a dog/cat, we suggest you do a couple of things. First please create a free account here and add the pet with a status of found. If someone uses our search to look for found pets in our database you listing the pet will significantly increase the chances of reuniting the owner and pet. We also suggest that you read our lost and found FAQ.

Animal Shelter Facts

Did you know that The longer a dog’s nose, the more effective it’s internal cooling system

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